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Master of Arts in Teaching - Secondary Education: English

M.A.T. English Courses

English Course Descriptions

ENGL 5000: Great Books A course exploring the concept of "Great Books," including history and definition of the concepts both of "book" and of "greatness." Many texts (fiction and nonfiction, as poetic) will be read closely in probing these definitions. The texts will range globally, from the earliest examples of writing (including pre-literate, oral traditions) through the present. Texts will be read in English translation necessary. Both canonic writers (e.g., Homer, Mary Shelley) and writers outside conventional definitions of the canon will be considered.

ENGL 5020: Methods of Teaching English I This course prepares teacher candidates to become effective teachers of literature. Students will explore methods and literary texts as well as develop teaching materials and assessments for the English classroom.

ENGL 5030: Methods of Teaching English II This course prepares teacher candidates to become effective teachers of writing. Students will explore the theory and methods of teaching writing vital to the English classroom. With emphasis on writing process and studies of language, candidates will develop appropriate teaching materials and assessments.

ENGL 5100: Literary Theory A course focusing on different schools and trends in literary criticism of the twentieth century, including Russian Formalism, New Criticism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Reader-Response criticism, Psycho- analytic Theory, Marxist criticism, New Historicism, Feminist literary criticism, Cultural Studies, and Post- colonial Studies.

ENGL 5114: Literature of the Adolescent Experience This course emphasizes thematic connections between contemporary adolescent literature and traditional literature from various literary perspectives. Course topics for study will include application of literary theory representation of adolescence in diverse cultural contexts, and connections to middle and secondary English classrooms. This course is recommended for English majors in the teaching certification program.

ENGL 5120: 19th Century American Literature and Culture A graduate-level survey of early modern English literature and literary culture, ca. 1500-1700. Typical areas of emphasis will include significant literary movements within the era, major authors, and/or attention to a specific genre. Course content will include some attention to historical context, research methods, and applied critical theory.

ENGL 5130: Studies in Southern Literature An expansive course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of nineteenth and twentieth century Southern American literature. Topics may include nineteenth century slave narratives, the Southern Renaissance, Southern fiction since 1945, Civil Rights literature, poetry, and/or major authors.

ENGL 5140: 20th Century American Literature and Culture A course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of the African American Novel from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Topics may include but are not limited to modernism, postmodernism, slave narrative, neo-slave narrative, the blues novel, and other literary movements such as The Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement, The New Black Aesthetic, and/or major authors.

ENGL 5150: Studies in Shakespeare A graduate-level survey of Shakespeare’s dramatic works before and after 1600, with primary emphasis on the major comedies and tragedies and some attention to the histories, problem plays, and romances. Course content will include some attention to research methods and critical theory in the context of Shakespeare studies.

ENGL 5210 : Studies in Renaissance Literature A graduate-level survey of early modern English literature and literary culture, ca. 1500-1700. Typical areas of emphasis will include significant literary movements within the era, major authors, and/or attention to a specific genre. Course content will include some attention to historical context, research methods, and applied critical theory.

ENGL 5250: 19th Century British Literature A graduate-level survey of nineteenth century British literature and literary culture, ca. 1780-1900. Typical areas of emphasis will include significant literary movements within the era, major authors, and/or attention to a specific genre. Course content will include some attention to historical context, research methods, and applied critical theory.

ENGL 5260: 20th/21st Century British Literature A course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of British fiction from the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics may include but are not limited to modernism, postmodernism, war literature, literature between the wars, minor literary movements (such as Angry Young Men, The Movement, Poets of the Apocalypse), and/or major authors.

ENGL 5300: Literature by American Women A study of traditions in American women’s writing. The course may cover a wide range of texts or focus on a single theme, genre, period, literary movement, or cultural tradition.

ENGL 5350: Gender & Sexuality in American Literature A variable topics course, focusing on one or more the major issues, movements, forms, or themes in the study of gender and sexuality in American literature and culture. Topics may include masculinity and femininity in literature, feminism and womanism, and traditions of gay and lesbian self-representation.

ENGL 5400: African American Literature & Culture A course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of African American literature and culture from the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Topics may include but are not limited to modernism, postmodernism, African American womanism, Africana womanism, and other literary movements such as The Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement, The New Black Aesthetic, and/or major authors.

ENGL 5410: The African American Novel A course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of the African American Novel from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Topics may include but are not limited to modernism, postmodernism, slave narrative, neo-slave narrative, the blues novel, and other literary movements such as The Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement, The New Black Aesthetic, and/or major authors.

ENGL 5450: Race & Ethnicity in American Literature An expansive course focusing on the major movements, issues, or themes in the study of race and ethnicity in American literature and culture. Topics may include African American literature, post-war Jewish fiction, Native American literature, whiteness studies, Chicano- Latino literature, Asian American literature, literature and racism, double consciousness, migration narratives, and comparative studies of racial and ethnic experience.

ENGL 5600: Composition Theory This course is designed as an introduction to composition theory. It is designed for graduate students who wish to prepare for teaching in secondary and college educational settings and for those who wish to know more about composing theories and applications. Students will be introduced to bibliographical resources and research problems in composition; the interdisciplinary nature of college English teaching; the major texts and professional journals in rhetoric and composition studies; influential authors, teachers, leaders in the field; the history of writing instruction; the relationships between composition studies and literature/rhetoric/literary theory; writing across the curriculum; basic writing; computers and composition; pedagogical matters; and social, political, and cultural issues that shape the field.

ENGL 5620: Postcolonial Theory & Literature A study of postcolonial literary theory and literature. Texts written in English from a variety of formerly colonized regions will be studied; including, but not limited to, Africa, the Caribbean, South and Southeast Asia, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand. The focus will be on such topics as imperialism, race, gender, ethnicity, nation, language, and representation.

ENGL 5700: Response to Writing An introduction to one-on-one writing instruction (both online and face-to-face), classroom based writing consultancy, and theories that guide these practices. Students will write many kinds of documents, including essays about tutoring and consulting, and they will apply what they have learned in peer review situations. Additional readings will cover the history, theory, and practice of peer tutoring and its role in composition studies scholarship.

ENGL 5710: Contemporary American Poetry A study of post-1960 American poetry focusing upon the poets who represent major developments in traditional and non-traditional poetics along with a consideration of the styles, trends, and influences that inform contemporary American poetry.

ENGL 5720: Contemporary American Fiction This course examines the major movements, issues and themes in the study of contemporary American fiction. Topics may include Postmodernism; individual identity; race, class, and gender; dualism and pluralism; magic realism, and/or major authors.

ENGL 5730: Modern Drama A detailed study of selected English and American plays from 1900-1965, with attention to literary backgrounds and technical experimentation.

ENGL 5800: Special Topics in English A graduate-level seminar on special topics important to professional, postgraduate liberal studies. Typical areas of emphasis will include significant literary movements within a particular era of American, British or post- colonial cultures, major authors, and/or attention to a specific genre. Course content will include some attention to historical context, research methods, and applied critical theory.

ENGL 6300: Internship Teaching College English Practicum in teaching college writing and/or literature. English department faculty will work with interns as they develop and teach lessons in a college classroom. Participants may enroll for up to two semesters but must teach composition and literature if the course is repeated.

ENGL 6400: Directed Research in English Individuals will develop their own research project and complete the research and writing by working with a graduate faculty member. Students will be guided in research methods and practical applications for academic writing and publishing.

ENGL 6995: Thesis Research Research while enrolled for a master's degree in English under the direction of faculty members in the English Department. The candidate works under the direction and advice of a thesis director to produce a thesis research proposal including an in-depth review of literature.

ENGL 6999: Thesis Preparation Thesis preparation while enrolled for a master's degree in English under the direction of faculty members in English Department. The candidate works under the direction and advice of a thesis director to produce the thesis.

Education Course Descriptions

All education courses are restricted to students who have been admitted into the M.A.T. program.

EDUC 5100 - Social and Cultural Awareness in American Education (3-0-3): An examination of multicultural and social concerns that influence the teaching and learning process. Study current issues and trends impacting American public schools as related to preparing pre-service teachers to teach diverse learners in a cross-cultural society. Technology will be used to perform word processing, Internet research, software reviews and electronic portfolio assignments. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.A.T. program

EDUC 5101 - Exceptionalities and Cognitive Development of Learners (3-0-3): A survey of basic characteristics and educational needs of learners with physical, emotional, intellectual disabilities. Additional study will concentrate on the cognitive and learning developmental aspects of teaching adolescents and young adults with a variety of abilities and disabilities. Course will focus on learning theories and models used in education. Technology will be used to conduct word processing, Internet research, software reviews and electronic portfolio assignments. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.A.T. program

EDUC 5102 - Practicum I (0-3-1): This course will be the Summer Semester portion of the field experiences for this program. It is designed for candidates to observe and participate in experiential learning in public school classrooms, before or after school programs, youth centers, or similar situations where diverse groups of adolescents are engaged in the teaching and learning process. The practicum experiences will allow candidates to observe, reflect and/or work with learners based on topics presented in EDUC 5100-5101. Candidates will be required to spend approximately ten hours per week in the field and must have proof of liability insurance to participate in the course. Co-requisite: EDUC 5100 and EDUC 5101

EDUC 5200 - Curriculum and Instruction for Teaching Secondary School Learners (3-0-3): This course is designed to teach candidates the theory and best practices for developing and delivering instruction in high school settings. Focus will be on instructional strategies, motivational and classroom management techniques, pedagogical knowledge, skills and dispositions for effective teaching and learning, and the construction and administration of learning assessment instruments. Technology will be used to perform word processing, Internet research, software reviews and electronic portfolio assignments. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.A.T. program

EDUC 5201 - Practicum II (0-3-1): This course is the Fall Semester portion of the field experiences for the program. It is designed for candidates to observe and participate in experiential learning in public school classrooms, before- or after-school programs, youth centers, or similar situations where diverse groups of adolescents are engaged in the teaching and learning process. The practicum experiences will allow candidates to observe, reflect and/or work with learners based on topics presented in EDUC 5200 and in content courses. Candidates will be required to spend approximately ten hours per week in the field and must have proof of liability insurance to participate in the course. Pre-requisite: EDUC 5102; Co-requisite: EDUC 5200

EDUC 5300 - Internship Seminar (1-0-1): This seminar is designed to discuss common issues, concerns and successes that candidates are having as teaching interns. Some topics will include developing curriculum and instruction for diverse and special needs learners, designing and implementing thematic units using Georgia Performance Standards (GPS), using classroom management techniques, developing and using data from student assessments, interpreting standardized testing data, using instructional technology to facilitate student learning, and recognizing legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities. Technology will be used to perform word processing, Internet research, software review, and electronic portfolio assignments. Co-requisite: EDUC 5301

EDUC 5301 - Secondary School Internship (0-12-4): This course is a clinical experience in high school settings for teaching the major concentration during the Spring semester. Candidates will be responsible for two weeks of observations and reflections before eight weeks of taking full-time responsibility for classroom instruction, and end with two final weeks of observations and reflections. School-based mentor teachers will work with interns in meeting program outcomes through teaching assignments. University field supervisors will observe and assess performance. Candidates must have proof of liability insurance to participate in course. Co-requisite: EDUC 5300

EDUC 5400 - Action Research Project (2-1-2): This course provides candidates with an opportunity to develop an action research project based on coursework, practicums, and clinical experiences. Candidates will demonstrate an understanding of the theory behind action research in teacher education and will utilize qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. They will design and implement an action research project, independently or in small groups, with the goals of publication, staff development, school policy change, or curriculum restructuring, in mind. All projects must be approved by the instructor and follow IRB specifications. Participants will define questions, determine research methods, and gather and assess data. This directed research project is a capstone experience in the M.A.T. degree program. Pre-requisites: EDUC 5300 & 5301.