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Fall 2012

 
 
 
 TitleOwnerCategoryModified DateSize 
Syllabus - BIOL 1107 FA 2012  8/10/2013374.84 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1107L FA 2012  8/10/2013360.09 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1152L FA 2012  8/13/2013429.99 KBDownload
 
 
 

Spring 2013

 
 
 
 TitleOwnerCategoryModified DateSize 
Syllabus - BIOL 1107 SP 2013  8/10/2013398.83 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1107L SP 2013  8/10/2013451.49 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1152L SP 2013  8/14/2013227.42 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 4202L SP 2013  8/10/2013408.08 KBDownload
 
 
 

Summer 2013

 
 
 
 TitleOwnerCategoryModified DateSize 
Syllabus - BIOL 3200 SU 2013  8/10/2013420.36 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 3201 SU 2013  8/10/2013490.82 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 4700 SU 2013  8/13/2013262.86 KBDownload
 
 
 

Fall 2013

 
 
 
 TitleOwnerCategoryModified DateSize 
Syllabus - BIOL 1151L - Fall 2013  8/17/2014565.93 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1152L - Fall 2013  8/17/2014449.85 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 4202L - Fall 2013  8/17/2014423.39 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 4999A - Fall 2013  8/17/2014230.00 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 4999B - Fall 2013  8/17/2014230.00 KBDownload
 
 
 

Spring 2014

 
 
 
 
 
 

Summer 2014

 
 
 
 TitleOwnerCategoryModified DateSize 
Syllabus - BIOL 1111L - Summer 2014  8/17/2014459.64 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1152 - Summer 2014  8/17/2014532.29 KBDownload
Syllabus - BIOL 1152L - Summer 2014  8/17/2014653.75 KBDownload
 
 
 

Syllabus - BIOL 3201: Genetics (Summer 2012)

 
 
 

Biology 3201 - Genetics
Course Syllabus - Summer 2013

Individuals with disabilities who need to request accommodations should contact the Disability Services Coordinator, Student Center 255, 678-466-5445,.disabilityservices@mail.clayton.edu.


Number and title: BIOL 3201, Genetics

Credit hours: 3.0 semester credit hours

Catalog description: A study of Mendelian principles, molecular genetics and population genetics. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of inheritance, gene expression and influences on evolution are included.

Course prerequisites: BIOL 1107/L and BIOL 1108/L with a C or better

Notebook Computer Requirement:

Each CSU student is required to have ready access throughout the semester to a notebook computer that meets faculty-approved hardware and software requirements for the student's academic program. Students will sign a statement attesting to such access.  For further information on CSU's Official Notebook Computer Policy, please go to http://itpchoice.clayton.edu/policy.htm.

Computer Skill Prerequisites:

  • Able to use the WindowsTM operating system.
  • Able to use a the Microsoft WordTM word processing program.
  • Able to send and receive e-mail using the OutlookTM or Outlook ExpressTM program.
  • Able to use a Web browser.

In-class Use of Student Notebook Computers:

Student notebook computers may be used in this class. Various in class assignments will require students to use their computers.  In addition, computers will be required to access course materials and to communicate with your instructor.  Plan on bringing your laptop to class or arrange with another student prior to the meeting time of the class to share computers.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Biology outcomes:

BIOL 3201 supports outcomes 1, 4, 5, and 7 of the biology major:

  • Outcome 1.  Knowledge of the basic principles of major fields of biology.
  • Outcome 4.  Ability to communicate orally and in writing in a clear concise manner.
  • Outcome 5.  Ability to collect, evaluate, and interpret scientific data, and employ critical thinking skills to solve problems in biological science and supporting fields.
  • Outcome7.  Appreciation for the impact of biological and physical science on the environment and society

Course objectives:

  • To understand concepts in molecular genetics including but not limited to DNA structure, DNA replication and repair, transcription, RNA modification, translation, control of gene expression in eukaryotes, and recombinant DNA technology.
  • To understand concepts in Mendelian genetics including but not limited to vocabulary and problem solving.
  • To understand concepts in chromosomal genetics including but not limited to chromosomal inheritance, sex linkage, mapping, chromosomal mutation.
  • To understand concepts that do not obey Mendelian rules.
  • To understand concepts of population and quantitative genetics.
  • To apply the information learned in class to genetic applications and problems.

Instructor Information:

Dr. Paul Guy Melvin
Office: NBS 150
Phone: (678) 466-4789
Internet address:  faculty.clayton.edu/pmelvin
Summer Office Hours: Click here


Required Textbook Information:

Concepts of Genetics by William S. Klug, 10th Edition, Pearson, Published by Prentice Education, Inc., 2012

Masteringgenetics.com will be used during this course.  Students purchasing the newest (10th) edition of the textbook in the campus bookstore should have access to masteringgenetics.com included with their text.  If you purchase the book online or use an older edition, you may need to purchase access to the website separately. 

Access to masteringgenetics.com ONLY = $55.00 (free with the purchase of textbook from the bookstore)

Access to masteringgenetics.com AND online ebook access = $78.00 (free with purchase of textbook from the bookstore)

Text coverage: Chapters 1 – 4, 10 – 18.


Evaluation: SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

Points

Exam 1

100

Exam 2

100

Exam 3

100

Final Exam (1/2 to 2/3 of this exam is material covered since exam 3, 1/3 to 1/2 points of this exam is comprehensive for the entire semesters)

100

Homework

25

Quizzes

75

Total

500

*The final point total for the course will vary based on the number and value of assignments/quizzes given.

Grading:

Your final grade will be determined as follows:

Grade

Percentage range

A

90-100%

B

80-89%

C

70-79%

D

60-69%

F

Below 60%

Mid-term Progress Report

The mid-term grade in this course will be issued prior to June 21, 2013, and it will be based on 2 examinations and on any assignments given.  To calculate your grade, you should use the following formula:  (the number of points you earned) / (total number of possible points).  Based on this grade, students may choose to withdraw from the course and receive a grade of 'W'.   Students pursuing this option must fill out an official withdrawal form, available in the Office of the Registrar or from the Registrar's webpage, on or before the mid-term, which occurs on JUNE 21, 2013.  If the withdrawal is submitted after June 21, 2013, the grade will be a 'WF', which is equivalent to an F in the calculation of a student's GPA.


Tentative course schedule:   

Date:

Topic

Chapters

 

Introduction to Genetics

1

 

Mitosis and  Meiosis

2

 

Mendelian Genetics

3

 

Extension of Mendelian Genetics

4

 

Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes

7

 

Chromosome Mutations: Variation in Chromosome Number and Arrangement

8

Jun 4

Exam 1

 

 

DNA Structure and Analysis

10

 

DNA Replication and Recombination

11

 

DNA Organization in Chromosomes

12

 

The Genetic Code and Transcription

14

Jun 18

Exam 2

 

Last Day to Drop w/o Academic Penalty: Friday, June 21

 

Translation and Proteins

15

Regulation of Gene Expression in Prokaryotes

17

Regulation of Gene Expression in Eukaryotes

18

Jul 4

NO CLASS

Jul 9

Exam 3

 

Gene Mutation and DNA Repair

16

 

Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Proteomics

21

 

Recombinant DNA Technology and Gene Cloning

13

 

Cancer and Regulation of the Cell Cycle

20

 

Extranuclear Inheritance

9

Jul 23

Exam 4/Final Exam

 

This lecture schedule and lecture testing is tentative and may change. Tests may be given the week before or the week after the week listed here--or during the week predicted. Specific test dates will be announced one week in advance in class.

 Classroom regulations and policies:

Students must abide by policies in the Clayton State University Student Handbook, and the Basic Undergraduate Student Responsibilities.

1.      No cellular telephones or communication devices are to be used during class.  Each time a student's device makes an audible sound, the student will lose 1 point.  If it happens during an exam, the student will lose 2 points.   If the instructor’s phone makes an audible sound, each student will gain 1 point during lecture or 2 points during an exam. 

2.      No talking while the instructor or another student is talking.  Be respectful.  Students repeatedly violating this policy will be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.

3.      Computers are for note-taking, research, or other class related activities only.  Students using them for surfing the internet, checking email, playing games, etc will be asked to turn them off.  On subsequent offenses, the student may be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.

4.      Visitors are not permitted without the instructor’s permission.  Children are not allowed in the classroom at anytime.

5.      Assignments are due at the beginning of class.  You may turn in late assignments for half credit.  An assignment is considered late if it is not turned in when I collect them, even if you are not present in class when I ask for them.

6.      Quizzes will usually be given at the beginning of class.  Students who are late must remain outside of the classroom until the quiz is finished and will receive a grade of zero.  A quiz may be based on your attendance on a particular day.  Quizzes, including attendance quizzes, may be unannounced.  There are no make-up quizzes. 

7.      Exams start at the beginning of class.  The instructor may permit a student to begin late if the excuse is reasonable.  Students who are more than 10 minutes late will not be allowed to begin the exam. There are no make-up exams.  Late students will have to turn in their exam when the last “on-time” student finishes.  Late students will not receive extra time on their exam.

8.      Attendance is expected.  You are responsible for obtaining any missed information from other students.  This includes information concerning quiz dates, exam dates, etc.  Students who do not attend regularly generally do not do well in the course.  There are no "excused absences" in this class.

9.      Your lowest quiz grade on masteringgenetics.com will be dropped.  There are no make-up quizzes.  Quizzes worth more than 10 points are not eligible to be dropped.

10.  Each student is granted an absence from one exam during the course of the semester.  This is a “no questions asked” situation.  Illness, travel, court, doctor’s appointment, oversleeping, etc. are all valid.  It is up to you how you use it.  Missing more than one exam or quiz will result in a grade of zero for the missed work.  There are no make-up exams.  Your final exam grade will be doubled to make up for your missed exam.  If you have not missed any exams, your lowest exam grade will be dropped and your final exam grade will be doubled to make up the difference.  Your final exam grade will be doubled to make-up for your missed exam.

11.  ALL STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE FINAL EXAM, REGARDLESS OF YOUR SCORES ON YOUR PREVIOUS EXAMS.  The final exam grade cannot be dropped as your lowest.

12.  No form of academic dishonesty will be tolerated in this course.  The most common forms are cheating and plagiarism, but any type of activity that is considered dishonest by reasonable standards will constitute academic dishonesty.  The minimum penalty is a grade of zero on the work involved.  The maximum penalty is expulsion from the university.  Be aware that students found in violation of the university’s academic dishonesty code have lost scholarships, athletic eligibility, and/or their U.S. student visa (if an international student).  All forms of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs for investigation.  Judicial procedures are described at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/judicial/.

13.  No form of disruptive behavior will be tolerated in this class.  While a variety of behaviors can be disruptive in a classroom setting, more serious examples include belligerent, abusive, profane, and/or threatening behavior.  A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or is found to be repeatedly disruptive while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class.  A student who is dismissed is entitled to due process and will be afforded such rights as soon as possible following dismissal.  If found in violation, a student may be administratively withdrawn and may receive a grade of WF.  For more information, please refer to: http://as.clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm

Common examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

  • Monopolizing classroom discussions
  • Failing to respect the rights of other students to express their viewpoints
  • Talking when the instructors or other students are speaking
  • Constant questions or interruptions which interfere with the instructor’s presentation
  • Overt inattentiveness (e.g. sleeping or surfing the internet)
  • Creating excessive noise
  • Entering the class late or leaving the class early
  • Use of cell phones or pagers in class
  • Inordinate or inappropriate demands for time or attention
  • Poor personal hygiene (e.g. noticeably offensive body odor)
  • Refusal to comply with faculty direction

More extreme examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

  • Use of profanity or pejorative language
  • Intoxication
  • Verbal abuse of instructor or other students (e.g. taunting, badgering, intimidation)
  • Harassment of instructor or other students
  • Threats to harm oneself or others
  • Physical violence

Students exhibiting these types of behaviors can expect a warning from the instructor or dismissal for the lesson in which the behavior occurs. Failure to correct such behaviors can result in dismissal from the course.

Students exhibiting these more extreme examples of disruptive behavior may be dismissed from the lesson or the entire course.

Students dismissed from a lesson will leave the classroom immediately or may be subject to additional penalties. Dismissed students are responsible for any course material or assignments missed.

Students dismissed from a course have the right to appeal the dismissal to the department head responsible for the course. Appeals beyond the department head may also be pursued. If no appeal is made or the appeal is unsuccessful, the student will receive a grade o WF (withdrawal – failing) regardless of the current grade in the course.

Conditions attributed to physical or psychological disabilities are not considered as a legitimate excuse for disruptive behavior.

The description of disruptive behavior and listings of examples of disruptive behavior are taken from the Web sites of James Madison University, the University of Delaware and Virginia Tech.

 

Changes or additions to this syllabus, including reading, exam schedule, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.


 
 
 

Syllabus - BIOL 3200: Cell Biology (Summer 2012)

 
 
 



BIOL 3200: Cell Biology

Course Syllabus

Summer 2013


Individuals with disabilities who need to request accommodations should contact the Disability Services Coordinator, Administration Building room # 23, 678-466-5445, disabilityservices@mail.clayton.edu.


Number and title: BIOL 3200, Cell Biology

Credit hours: 3.0 semester credit hours

Catalog description: An exploration of life's basic unit. Students will examine the cell from both structural and functional viewpoints. The fundamentals of cellular chemistry, life cycles, and regulation will be discussed. Seminal experiments in cell biology will be examined, and current studies in primary research journals will be addressed. Students will gain an understanding of how contemporary methods of laboratory experimentation are being used to unravel the mysteries of life's irreducible unit.

Course prerequisites: BIOL 1108, BIOL1108L, CHEM 2412 (May be taken concurrently), CHEM 2412L (May be taken concurrently)

Notebook Computer Requirement:

Each CSU student is required to have ready access throughout the semester to a notebook computer that meets faculty-approved hardware and software requirements for the student's academic program. Students will sign a statement attesting to such access.  For further information on CSU's Official Notebook Computer Policy, please go to http://itpchoice.clayton.edu/policy.htm.

Computer Skill Prerequisites:

  • Able to use the WindowsTM operating system.
  • Able to use a the Microsoft WordTM word processing program.
  • Able to send and receive e-mail using the OutlookTM or Outlook ExpressTM program.
  • Able to use a Web browser.

In-class Use of Student Notebook Computers:

Student notebook computers may be used in this class. Various in-class assignments may require students to use their computers.  In addition, computers will be required to access course materials and to communicate with your instructor.  Plan on bringing your laptop to class or arrange with another student prior to the meeting time of the class to share computers.

Student Learning Outcomes:

BIOL3200 supports outcomes 1, 4, 5, and 7 of the biology major:

  • Outcome 1.  Knowledge of the basic principles of major fields of biology.
  • Outcome 4.  Ability to communicate orally and in writing in a clear concise manner.
  • Outcome 5.  Ability to collect, evaluate, and interpret scientific data, and employ critical thinking skills to solve problems in biological science and supporting fields.
  • Outcome 7.  Appreciation for the impact of biological and physical science on the environment and society

Course objectives:

  • To investigate the organelles that compose eukaryotic animal cells and understand how these organelles function individually and cumulatively to contribute to the overall function of the cell.
  • To understand the molecular interactions that occur within cells and contribute to the overall function of the cell.
  • To investigate cell-cell communication and cell-environment communication.

Instructor Information:

Dr. Paul Guy Melvin
Office: NBS 150
Phone: (678) 466-4789
Internet address: faculty.clayton.edu/pmelvin
Summer Office Hours: Click here.


Textbook information:

Required text: The World of the Cell, 8th Edition. Becker, Kleinsmith, Hardin, and Bertoni.  Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 2012.

Recommended text: http://publications.nigms.nih.gov/insidethecell/pdf/inside_the_cell.pdf 


Evaluation:

 

Points

Exam 1

100

Exam 2

100

Exam 3

100

Exam 4/Final

100

Group Presentation

50

Quizzes/Assignments

50*

Total

  500

*The total points you earn on your quizzes and assignments will be used to determine the percentage of the total point values of all quizzes and assignments you earned.  This percentage will be scaled to 50 points when calculating your final exam grade. 

Grading:

Your final grade will be determined as a percentage total points earned and assigned as follows:

Grade

Percentage range

A

90-100%

B

80-89%

C

70-79%

D

60-69%

F

Below 60%

Mid-term Progress Report

The mid-term grade in this course will be issued prior to June 21, 2013, and it will be based on 2 examinations and on any assignments given.  To calculate your grade, you should use the following formula:  (the number of points you earned) / (total number of possible points).  Based on this grade, students may choose to withdraw from the course and receive a grade of 'W'.   Students pursuing this option must fill out an official withdrawal form, available in the Office of the Registrar or from the Registrar's webpage, on or before the mid-term, which occurs on Friday, June 21, 2013.  If the withdrawal is submitted after June 21, 2013, the grade will be a 'WF', which is equivalent to an F in the calculation of a student's GPA.


Tentative course schedule:  

 

Date

Topic

Chapters

 

Class Intro, History of Cell Bio

1

 

Preview of the Cell, Chemistry of the Cell, Macromolecules

1,2,3

 

Organelles - (Reading assignment with Study Guide)

4

 

Enzymes

6

Jun 4

Exam 1

 

 

Membranes I (Reading assignment with Study Guide) - Membranes II

7 and 8

 

Glycolysis and Fermentation

9

 

Aerobic Respiration

10

Jun 18

Exam 2

 

 

Endomembrane System

12

 

Last Day to Drop w/o Academic Penalty: Friday, June 22

 

 

Endomembrane System

12

 

Signal Transduction I

13

Jul 2

Exam 3

 

Jul 4

NO CLASS

 

 

Signal Transduction II

14

 

Cell Cycle Control

19 (pp 582-594)

 

Catch-up day (photosynthesis or cytoskeleton)

24

Jul 16

Exam 4/Final

 

Jul 18

Presentations

 

Jul 23

Presentations

 

This lecture schedule and lecture testing is tentative and may change. Tests may be given the week before or the week after the week listed here--or during the week predicted. Specific test dates will be announced one week in advance in class.

Classroom regulations and policies:

Students must abide by policies in the Clayton State University Student Handbook, and the Basic Undergraduate Student Responsibilities.

  1. No cellular telephones or communication devices are to be used during class.  Each time a student's device makes an audible sound, the student will lose 1 point.  If it happens during an exam, the student will lose 2 points.   If the instructor’s phone makes an audible sound, each student will gain 1 point during lecture or 2 points during an exam. 
  2. No talking while the instructor or another student is talking.  Be respectful  Students repeatedly violating this policy will be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.
  3. Computers are for note-taking, research, or other class related activities only.  Students using them for surfing the internet, checking email, playing games, etc will be asked to turn them off.  On subsequent offenses, the student may be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.
  4. Visitors are not permitted without the instructor’s permission.  Children are not allowed in the classroom at anytime.
  5. Assignments are due at the beginning of class.  You may turn in late assignments for half credit.  An assignment is considered late if it is not turned in when I collect them, even if you are not present in class when I ask for them.
  6. Quizzes will usually be given at the beginning of class.  Students who are late must remain outside of the classroom until the quiz is finished and will receive a grade of zero.  A quiz may be based on your attendance on a particular day.  Quizzes, including attendance quizzes, may be unannounced.  There are no make-up quizzes. 
  7. Exams start at the beginning of class.  The instructor may permit a student to begin late if the excuse is reasonable.  Students who are more than 10 minutes late will not be allowed to begin the exam. There are no make-up exams.  Late students will have to turn in their exam when the last “on-time” student finishes.  Late students will not receive extra time on their exam.
  8. Attendance is expected.  You are responsible for obtaining any missed information from other students.  This includes information concerning quiz dates, exam dates, etc.  Students who do not attend regularly generally do not do well in the course.  There are no "excused absences" in this class.
  9. Each student is granted an absence from one exam during the course of the semester.  This is a “no questions asked” situation.  Illness, travel, court, doctor’s appointment, oversleeping, etc. are all valid.  It is up to you how you use it.  Missing more than one exam will result in a grade of zero for the missed work.  If you have not missed any exams, your lowest exam grade will be dropped.  There are no make-up exams.  Your final exam grade will be doubled to make-up for your missed exam.
  10. ALL STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE FINAL EXAM, REGARDLESS OF YOUR SCORES ON YOUR PREVIOUS EXAMS.  The final exam grade cannot be dropped as your lowest.
  11. No form of academic dishonesty will be tolerated in this course.  The most common forms are cheating and plagiarism, but any type of activity that is considered dishonest by reasonable standards will constitute academic dishonesty.  The minimum penalty is a grade of zero on the work involved.  The maximum penalty is expulsion from the university.  Be aware that students found in violation of the university’s academic dishonesty code have lost scholarships, athletic eligibility, and/or their U.S. student visa (if an international student).  All forms of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs for investigation.  Judicial procedures are described at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/judicial/.
  12. No form of disruptive behavior will be tolerated in this class.  While a variety of behaviors can be disruptive in a classroom setting, more serious examples include belligerent, abusive, profane, and/or threatening behavior.  A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or is found to be repeatedly disruptive while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class.  A student who is dismissed is entitled to due process and will be afforded such rights as soon as possible following dismissal.  If found in violation, a student may be administratively withdrawn and may receive a grade of WF.  For more information, please refer to: http://as.clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm

Common examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

    1. Monopolizing classroom discussions
    2. Failing to respect the rights of other students to express their viewpoints
    3. Talking when the instructors or other students are speaking
    4. Constant questions or interruptions which interfere with the instructor’s presentation
    5. Overt inattentiveness (e.g. sleeping or surfing the internet)
    6. Creating excessive noise
    7. Entering the class late or leaving the class early
    8. Use of cell phones or pagers in class
    9. Inordinate or inappropriate demands for time or attention
    10. Poor personal hygiene (e.g. noticeably offensive body odor)
    11. Refusal to comply with faculty direction

Students exhibiting these types of behaviors can expect a warning from the instructor or dismissal for the lesson in which the behavior occurs. Failure to correct such behaviors can result in dismissal from the course.

    More extreme examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:
 

a.       Use of profanity or pejorative language

b.      Intoxication

c.       Verbal abuse of instructor or other students (e.g. taunting, badgering, intimidation)

d.      Harassment of instructor or other students

e.       Threats to harm oneself or others

f.       Physical violence

 

Students exhibiting these more extreme examples of disruptive behavior may be dismissed from the lesson or the entire course.

Students dismissed from a lesson will leave the classroom immediately or may be subject to additional penalties. Dismissed students are responsible for any course material or assignments missed.

Students dismissed from a course have the right to appeal the dismissal to the department head responsible for the course. Appeals beyond the department head may also be pursued. If no appeal is made or the appeal is unsuccessful, the student will receive a grade o WF (withdrawal – failing) regardless of the current grade in the course.

Conditions attributed to physical or psychological disabilities are not considered as a legitimate excuse for disruptive behavior.

The description of disruptive behavior and listings of examples of disruptive behavior are taken from the Web sites of James Madison University, the University of Delaware and Virginia Tech.

Changes or additions to this syllabus, including reading, exam schedule, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.


 
 
 

Syllabus - BIOL 1152L: Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (Summer 2012)

 
 
 

 



BIOL 1151L - Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
Course Syllabus – Fall 2013



Individuals with disabilities who need to request accommodations should contact the Disability Services Coordinator, Student Center 214, 678-466-5445, disabilityservices@mail.clayton.edu.


COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE

BIOL 1152L - Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

 

CREDIT HOURS

1.0 semester credit hours

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION

Laboratory accompanying BIOL 1152

 

CO-REQUISITES

BIOL 1152. Withdrawal from BIOL 1152L requires withdrawal from BIOL 1152 and vice versa. Material learned in the laboratory supports learning in the lecture course.  Students who have credit for BIOL 1152 from a prior term are accountable for the information previously learned in the course.  Videos and online resources are available for review. 

 

NOTEBOOK COMPUTER REQUIREMENT:

Each CSU student is required to have ready access throughout the semester to a notebook computer that meets faculty-approved hardware and software requirements for the student's academic program. Students will sign a statement attesting to such access.  For further information on CSU's Official Notebook Computer Policy, please go to http://itpchoice.clayton.edu/policy.htm.

 

COMPUTER SKILL PREREQUISITES:

You must be able to use Windows, Microsoft Word, Outlook Express (including attaching and retrieving files via e-mail), a Web browser, Adobe Acrobat Reader, and Microsoft Excel.

 

IN-CLASS USE OF STUDENT NOTEBOOK COMPUTERS:

Student notebook computers may be used in the classroom in this course for class assignments. Computers will be required to access course materials, work on assignments outside of class, and to communicate with your instructor.  Students may be permitted to use computers in class for general use at the instructor's discretion


COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • To provide opportunities for students to reinforce their knowledge of human anatomy and physiology.
  • To provide opportunities for students to learn human anatomy and physiology from a laboratory perspective.

 


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

 

Biology Outcomes

  • Students will display knowledge of the basic principles of major fields of biology.  This lab will focus on the development of a knowledge base in anatomy & physiology.
  • Students will display mastery of a broad range of basic lab skills applicable to biology.  BIOL1152L will provide experience with basic dissection skills.
  • Students will display the ability to communicate orally and in writing in a clear, concise manner.  Class reports will exercise written communication skills.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to collect, evaluate and interpret scientific data, and employ critical thinking to solve problems in biological science.  Use of computer simulations will allow students to gather data and perform experiments.

 

Nursing Outcomes

  • Students will utilize effective communication skills to promote therapeutic nurse-client interactions and good collegial relations.  Communication skills will be demonstrated on class assignments and exams.
  • Students will engage in critical thinking by using creative problem solving and making appropriate inferences, based on evidence derived from clinical practice.  Students will use information from lecture and class readings to answer questions on assignments and exams.
  • Students will demonstrate competence  in utilizing information technology resources to advance professional practice.  Students will use computer databases to find information relevant to course assignments and exams.
  • Students will utilize nursing therapeutics based on a synthesis of critical thinking strategies and a theoretical knowledge base in nursing to provide competent professional care and maximize healthy outcomes.  This course will provide the knowledge base in anatomy & physiology

 

Dental Hygiene Outcomes

  • Students will provide advanced professional and educational services using appropriate interpersonal, written, communication and critical thinking skills required for successful performance and progress in the profession.  Communication skills will be demonstrated on class assignments and exams.
  • Students will acquire knowledge in a technologically advanced manner in order to apply principles of sound research design to the critical evaluation of scientific literature related to general and oral health as a foundation for life-long learning.  Students will use computer databases to find information relevant to course assignments and exams.
  • Students will put into practice the principles of a sound research methodology in the planning, implementation and evaluation of scientific studies.  Students will use this skill to analyze and interpret information necessary for class assignments and exams.
  • Students will assess the need for treatment, then plan, provide, and evaluate treatment for the patient with advanced periodontal disease.  This course will provide students with a background to allow them to determine the difference between healthy and disease conditions.

 


INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION:

Dr. Jacqueline Jordan

Office: NBS 149
Phone: (678) 466-4781
E-mail: JacquelineJordan@clayton.edu
Homepage: faculty.clayton.edu/jjordan

Office hours: Monday and Wednesday 10:30 am – 12 noon, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, Tuesday 11:30 am – 12:30 pm (LAB 201), and by appointment

Renee McFarlane
Office: NBS 158
Phone: (678) 466-4790
E-mail: ReneeMcFarlane@clayton.edu

Homepage: faculty.clayton.edu/rmcfarla
Office hours: Office hours: Monday and Wednesday 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm, Tuesday and Thursday 9:00 am to 9:30 am, Wednesday 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm and by appointment only

 

Dr. Paul Guy Melvin
Office: NBS 150
Phone: (678) 466-4789
E-mail: PaulMelvin@clayton.edu
Homepage: faculty.clayton.edu/pmelvin
Office hours:  Current Schedule

 

CAMPUS MAP

 


 

LAB MEETING TIMES:

Course Number

Days

Time

Room

Instructor

24419

M

11:00 AM – 12:50 PM

LAB 201

McFarlane

24421

M

1:00 PM – 2:50 PM

LAB 201

McFarlane

24422

T

9:15 AM – 11:05 AM

LAB 201

Jordan

24388

T

12:45 PM – 2:35 PM

LAB 201

Jordan

25250

M

8:00 PM – 9:50 PM

LAB 201

Melvin

25507

W

8:00 PM – 9:50 PM

LAB 201

McFarlane

 


TEXTBOOK INFORMATION:

 

Required text: 

·         PHYSIOEX version 9.0 lab manual.

·         Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology, 9th edition, 2011, Martini, Nath, and Bartholomew which includes Martini's Atlas of the Human Body.

·         MasteringAandP PAL 3.0

Dissection Videos on DVD:

·         Videos of some of our dissections for this semester can be found here.

Optional: 

·         A medical dictionary such as Tabor's or the Medline Plus Medical Dictionary       

 


EVALUATION:

Item

Points

3 Lab Practicals @ 50 points each

150

Assignments

50

Attendance*

20

Total

220

 

* See "Classroom regulations and policies" below for details on how points will be deducted for absences


GRADING:

Your final grade will be determined as a percentage of total points earned as follows:

 

Grade

Percentage Range

A

90 - 100%

B

80 - 89%

C

70 - 79%

D

60 - 69%

F

below 60%

 

Your grade will be calculated by taking the total number of points you earned, dividing by the total number of points possible (based on the total possible value of all exams, quizzes, assignments, etc), and multiplying by 100 to obtain the percentage.

 

Points earned  x 100 = final course grade

Points possible

 

A mid-term grade typically is not posted for the lab. The last day to withdraw from lab and lecture is Friday, June 22, 2012.  Students may choose to withdraw from the course and receive a grade of "W."  Students pursuing this option must withdraw from the course using the DUCK or fill out an official withdrawal form, available in the Office of the Registrar, by mid-term, which occurs June 22, 2012.  Instructions for withdrawing can be found here.

 


Tentative Course Schedule*:

 

The course schedule is listed on a separate page.  Be sure to check the schedule often for changes in the due dates of assignments throughout the semester.  Please note that the schedule is tentative and subject to change.  Due dates for assignments may be changed at the instructor's discretion.  You are responsible for keeping track of due dates and turning in your work when it is required.

 

The course schedule includes a description of each week's laboratory activities, and includes supporting material, reading, and any assignments.  Students are required to review and COMPLETE this material BEFORE each week's laboratory meeting.  It is your responsibility to be prepared for each and every weekly lab meeting, so you should check with your instructor to verify what is required.

 

 

Date

Laboratory Topic

Jan 7

NO LAB CLASSES

Jan 14

Special Senses

Sheep Eye Dissection 

Sheep Eye Dissection Video – Student Version

CSU Video – Sheep Eye Dissection

Eye Model Video

Anatomy of Ear Video

Ear Model Video

Eye and Ear ID Sheet

Jan 21

NO LAB CLASSES

Jan 28

Endocrine System 

PhysioEx - Chapter 4 - dATA DUE FEB 4

Endocrine ID Sheet

Feb 4

Cardiovascular System - Anatomy of the Heart

CSU Video - Sheep Heart Dissection

BRING YOUR DISSECTION KIT TO LAB

Heart ID Sheet

Feb 11

Lab Practical I

Feb 18

Cardiovascular System – Physiology

PhysioEx - Cardiovascular Dynamics (Chapter 5) - dATA DUE FEB 25

Vessel ID Sheet (REQUIRES PRACTICE ANATOMY LAB - PAL 3.0)

Feb 25

Respiratory System – Anatomy

BRING YOUR DISSECTION KIT TO LAB

Lung Dissection ID Sheet

Mar 1

LAST DAY TO DROP WITHOUT ACADEMIC PENALTY

Mar 4 – 8

SPRING BREAK – NO CLASSES

Mar 11





March 18

Respiratory System – Mechanics

PhysioEx - Chapter 7 - DATA DUE March 18




LAB PRACTICAL II

March 25

Digestive System - Anatomy and Physiology

Fetal Pig Dissection

CSU Video – Fetal Pig Dissection

BRING YOUR DISSECTION KIT TO LAB

Digestion ID Sheet 

PhysioEx – Chapter 8 - dATA DUE APRIL 1

April 1

Urinary System - Anatomy and Physiology

Bring your computer and dissection kit to lab

PhysioEx – Chapter 9 -  dATA DUE APRIL 8

Urinary ID Sheet

April 8

Acid-Base Balance

PhysioEx - Chapter 10 - DATA DUE APRIL 15

April 15

Lab Practical III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
























































*This schedule and is tentative and may change. Tests may be given the week before or the week after the week listed here--or during the week predicted. Specific test dates will be announced approximately one week in advance in class.


Classroom regulations and policies:

 

Mid-term Progress Report

Due to the relatively small number of laboratory grades that will have been returned by mid-term, no mid-term grade will be reported for this course.  Students making unsatisfactory progress will be contacted individually by the instructor before mid-term.

 

The last day to withdraw without academic accountability is Friday, June 22, 2012. It is each student's responsibility to keep up with their academic progress in this laboratory. If you have any questions as to whether or not you are making satisfactory progress, contact your instructor BEFORE June 22, 2012.

Instructions for Withdrawing are provided at this link.

General policies:

  • Changes or additions to this syllabus, including readings, exam dates, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.  If such changes are made, they will be posted on the announcements section of the instructor's web page and/or announced in class.
  • General data from this course may be used by the instructor for research on improved methods of teaching, leading to presentation or publication.  Data that would be used for this purpose would consist of anonymous data, with no identifying information from particular students (e.g., the overall average for the course, NOT grades from particular students).  If you do not wish for your instructor to include your data in such studies, fill out the withdrawal of consent form and bring it to your instructor.
  • Students must abide by policies in the Clayton State University Student Handbook.  Students are also expected to abide by the guidelines in the Basic Student Responsibilities document on the registrar's web page.
  • Students must read and abide by all course policies as stated below and on the first day of class.
  • Visitors, including children, are not allowed in the laboratory.
  • Proper attire and footwear must be worn in the laboratory at all times.  Inappropriate items include, but are not limited to: shorts or skirts above the knee and shoes that do not cover the feet (e.g., sandals). Students should not wear hanging jewelry and long hair should be tied back during lab.  Students who come to lab without appropriate clothing or footwear will NOT be permitted to take part in lab and will forfeit any points for that day.
  • No smoking, other use of tobacco, eating, or drinking is permitted at any time in the laboratory.
  • Issues associated with grades on assignments (disputes over points for a question, questions about grading keys, etc.) must be brought to the instructor's attention in a timely manner.  This means that such concerns must be brought to your instructor within one week of the assignment being returned to the class.  Items that are not brought to the instructor in this time period will NOT be addressed.

University Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend and participate in every class meeting. Instructors establish specific policies relating to absences in their courses and communicate these policies to the students through the course syllabi. Individual instructors, based upon the nature of the course, determine what effect excused and unexcused absences have in determining grades and upon students’ ability to remain enrolled in their courses. The university reserves the right to determine that excessive absences, whether justified or not, are sufficient cause for institutional withdrawals or failing grades.

Course Attendance Policy

  • Students are required to attend weekly meetings of the laboratory and will be checked at the beginning of each lab period.
  • Students must be present at the beginning of the weekly laboratory meetings (laboratory start times are indicated on this syllabus).  Late arrivals will result in loss of attendance points for that day.
  • Students are NOT permitted to attend any section of the laboratory other than the one that they are registered for.  Failure to attend the weekly meeting of the laboratory for the entire 1 hour and 50 minutes will result in loss of attendance and participation points for that day.
  • If you miss lab, you are still responsible for the lab material on the lab practical.
  • If you are unable to attend a weekly laboratory meeting, written documentation of an unavoidable personal or immediate family emergency from a doctor or other competent authority MUST be presented to your instructor on the first day that you return to laboratory.  This policy applies to both weekly laboratory meetings and lab practicals.  Routine scheduled appointments are not valid excuses for missing lab, so students should not schedule such appointments during laboratory times.
  • There are NO exceptions to these rules.  

Missed Work

Unexcused absences from laboratory result in a grade of zero (0) for any graded work that was assigned that week.  You cannot turn in assignments from a lab you missed.  If you have a written excuse from a competent authority (doctor, judge, etc.), the missed points for the laboratory will not count against you.  A valid excuse is defined as the following: Jury duty, death in the immediate family, or student is incapacitated to the point where he/she is hospitalized on day of exam. Excuses will not be accepted for routine procedures (checkups, teeth cleanings, eye exams, etc). DO NOT UNDER ANY OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES ASK TO TAKE YOUR PRACTICAL AT ANY OTHER TIME FOR ANY OTHER REASON.    

There are NO makeups for lab practical exams.  If you have an excused absence for a date when a lab practical was given, those points will not be considered in calculating your grade (however, this means that the other graded work will be responsible for a greater weight in determining your final grade). You are only allowed ONE excused absence from a lab practical. If you miss more than one practical with an excused absence, you will be expected to ask for a hardship withdrawal, since the lab practicals count for a majority of the class points.

Late assignments

Lab exercises are due at the beginning of lab on the assigned date.  Any assignment that is not turned in at the beginning of lab period is considered late.  There is a 20% per school day (M-F) penalty for late lab reports. Lab reports will not be accepted more than one week after they are due.  Electronic submission of assignments is only allowed if the instructor specifically permits it.  If it was not permitted, electronic submissions will not be accepted and your work will be considered late, losing points until the instructor receives a printed copy of the assignment.  Printing problems are not an acceptable excuse for submitting work late.  Under NO circumstances will assignments be accepted more than one week after they are due or after the graded work has been returned to the class, whichever is sooner. Turn in all parts of your assignment together. No supplemental materials may be added once you have turned in the assignment.

Academic Integrity 

Cheating in any form will not be tolerated; all work that you turn in must be in your own words and must be your own work.  If your brainpower did not generate what you turn in, it is considered cheating.  Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to: falsifying data from an experiment, copying the work of another person, allowing another person to do your assignment, allowing another student to copy your work, working in a group on a graded item, copying or closely paraphrasing referenced sources, using anything but your brainpower on an exam, etc.  Misconduct in any form will result in a zero on the assignment for all involved students and academic misconduct forms will be filed with the Office of Student Conduct for any violation.  Judicial procedures are described on the webpage of the Office of Student Conduct.

Disruption of the Learning Environment

Behavior that disrupts the teaching–learning process during class activities will not tolerated. This includes belligerent, abusive, profane, and/or threatening behavior. A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or behavior while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class.

    Examples of disruptive behavior:

Common examples of behaviors that may be disruptive include, but are not limited to:

  • Refusal to comply with faculty direction
  • Monopolizing classroom discussions
  • Talking when the instructor or others are speaking
  • Failing to respect the rights of other students to express their viewpoints
  • Constant questions or interruptions that interfere with the instructor’s presentation
  • Creating excessive noise
  • Use of electronic devices (pagers, iPods, MP3 players, or cell phones) in the classroom without the instructor’s approval
  • Overt inattentiveness (e.g., sleeping or reading the paper in class)
  • Inordinate or inappropriate demands for time or attention
  • Routinely entering the class late or leaving early without instructor permission.
  • Leaving and re-entering the class during lecture.
  • Verbally abusing an instructor or student (i.e. cursing or extremely loud talking directed at a particular person)
  • Threatening to physically harm an instructor or student through verbal or body gestures.
  • Intimidating through body gestures and/or posture.

Students exhibiting these types of behaviors can expect a warning from the instructor or dismissal for the class period in which the behavior occurred.  Failure to correct such behaviors can result in dismissal from the course.

     More extreme examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

  • Use of profanity or pejorative language
  • Intoxication
  • Verbal abuse (e.g., taunting, badgering, intimidation)
  • Harassment
  • Threats to harm oneself or others
  • Physical violence

A student who is dismissed from a course for unacceptable and/or disruptive behavior is entitled to due process and will be afforded such rights within 3 class days following dismissal. If found in violation after the review process, the student’s dismissal will be upheld and a grade of WF may be issued for the course.

Conditions attributed to physical or psychological disabilities are not considered as a legitimate excuse for disruptive behavior.

Exam/quiz policies

Specific policies on exams and quizzes will be provided on the day of the exam/quiz itself, but several rules apply to all testing situations

1.      All electronic devices including cell phones, palm pilots, pagers, calculators, MP3 players, etc. are not allowed during exams or quizzes, unless specifically permitted by the instructor.  During such activities, these devices are not permitted to be in your possession at all (which means they cannot be clipped to your belt, in your pocket, etc.).  Possession and/or use of these items during an exam or quiz will result in an automatic zero on the graded activity, and may result in a charge for academic misconduct.

2.      If a cell phone or other electronic device makes noise (by ringing, buzzing, etc.) and disrupts the testing environment, even if it is not on your person, the instructor will penalize the responsible student(s) by taking points from their score.

Other Policies

Participation in laboratory activities involves an inherent risk of injury. In the event of injury, the student should immediately inform the instructor or laboratory technician who will file an accident report. The injured party will be given first aid and referred to appropriate medical facilities for follow-up.

 

Lab exercises: You are expected to prepare for the current week's exercise prior to lab so that you will already be familiar with the topic at hand.  This includes previewing the videos and reading the information in the lab manual and any handouts provided by the instructor.  This will enable to you to work through the lab on your own, asking the instructor when you have questions.  

Electronic devices: All electronic devices including cell phones, palm pilots, pagers, calculators, etc. are not allowed to be used in the laboratory at any time.  Possession and/or use of these items during laboratory time will result in a zero on the graded activity (if any on that day) or deduction of 10 points on next lab practical.  

Email: Each student must activate his/her e-mail account at Clayton State University. The class list serve will be the only method for communicating with the class by email.  Important announcements will be sent to the class on the class list serve.  You should also check course web pages regularly for new postings. Handouts given in class and other important items will be posted on the web page for this class.

Communication from personal email accounts (e.g., Yahoo, gmail, etc.) is acceptable, as long as the following requirements are met:

  1. You clearly identify yourself in the body of the email
  2. You clearly identify which class you are writing to me about
  3. The subject line of your email is suitably descriptive that I can tell it isn't Spam or a virus (e.g., do not send emails with a subject of "Hello", etc.)
  4. You do not ask me specific questions concerning grades, as they cannot be discussed on such email accounts.

Emails that do not meet these requirements will not receive a response.

 

Changes or additions to this syllabus, including reading, exam schedule, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.

 

Operation Study: At Clayton State University, we expect and support high motivation and academic achievement. Look for Operation Study activities and programs this semester that are designed to enhance your academic success such as study sessions, study breaks, workshops, and opportunities to earn Study Bucks (for use in the University Bookstore) and other items.

 
 
 

Syllabus - BIOL 1111: Introduction to Biology (Summer 2012)

 
 
 

Biology 1111L - Introductory Biology Laboratory
Course Syllabus –  Summer 2012

____________________________________________________________________

Individuals with disabilities who need to request accommodations should contact the
Disability Services Coordinator, Student Center 214, 678-466-5445,.
disabilityservices@mail.clayton.edu

____________________________________________________________________________________

Course Description:

Number and Title:

BIOL1111L, Introductory Biology Laboratory

Sections CRN 53612, CRN 53613, CRN 53614

Credit Hours:

1.0 semester credit hours

Catalog Description:   

Laboratory accompanying BIOL1111, Introductory Biology I

Course Co-requisite:   

BIOL 1111, Introductory Biology I

Note: Due to the co-requisite nature of BIOL 1111L and BIOL 1111, if either course is dropped, the other must also be dropped.  Any exceptions to this rule must be approved by the department chair.

Computer Requirement:

Each CSU student is required to have ready access throughout the semester to a notebook computer that meets faculty-approved hardware and software requirements for the student's academic program. Students will sign a statement attesting to such access. For further information on CSU's Official Notebook Computer Policy, please go to http://itpchoice.clayton.edu/policy.htm .

Computer Skill Prerequisites:

Able to use the WindowsTM operating system.

Able to use the Microsoft WordTM  word processing program.

Able to send and receive e-mail using the OutlookTM or Outlook ExpressTM program.

Able to use a Web browser (preferably Microsoft ExplorerTM).

Able to print documents either on your home computer's printer or Smart Print (networked printers on campus).

Must have Acrobat Reader on computer to access lab materials. This program can be obtained for free at the following website: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

In-class Use of Student Notebook Computers:

You will be required to use your computer and internet service to access the laboratory manual, which is posted on the web. You will need to access the manual to obtain protocols, lab report sheets, the course syllabus, lab review pages and other important information.

Program Learning Outcomes:

General Education Outcomes:

The following links provide tabular descriptions of the communications outcome and the critical thinking outcome components (see BIOL1111L in table):

Communications outcomes components

Critical thinking outcomes components

Teacher Education Standards:

The content of this course syllabus correlates to education standards established by national and state education governing agencies, accrediting agencies and learned society/ professional education associations. Please refer to the course correlation matrices located at the following web site:

http://a-s.clayton.edu/teachered/Standards%20and%20Outcomes.htm

Course Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

Make observations and to follow the scientific method in biology.

Use a microscope and other tools used in biological investigations.

Have a better understanding of biological principles learned in the lecture portion of the course.

____________________________________________________________

Instructor Information:

Dr. Jacqueline Jordan (CRN 53612)
O
ffice:  NBS 149
Phone: 678-466-4781
Email:  JacquelineJordan@clayton.edu
Internet address: http://faculty.clayton.edu/jjordan
Office Hours:  Mon/Tue/Wed/Thurs 5pm – 6pm

Dr. Samantha Fowler (CRN 53612)
Office: NBS 165
Phone: 678-466-4816
Email: SamanthaFowler@clayton.edu
Internet address: http://faculty.clayton.edu/sfowler4
Office Hours: Tues/Thurs  7:30 – 8:00am and 12:05 – 1:05pm

Dr. Paul Melvin
Office:  NBS 150
Phone: 678-466-4789
Email:  PaulMelvin@clayton.edu
Internet address:  faculty.clayton.edu/pmelvin
Office Hours:  Click here

____________________________________________________________

Class Meetings: All labs are held in the Natural and Behavioral Sciences Building - NBS 122

CRN

Day

Times

Room

Instructor

53612

Tues/Thurs

8:15 – 10:05pm

122

Jordan

53613

Tues/Thurs

10:15-12:05pm

122

Fowler

53614

Tues/Thurs

1:15-3:05pm

122

Melvin

____________________________________________________________

Textbook Information:

No textbook is required for this course. You will be using an on-line lab manual written by CSU faculty.

Recommended supplies:

It is recommended that you bring colored pencils/markers/calculators to class because a number of laboratories require you to make a graph and calculate data.

____________________________________________________________

Evaluation:

item

points

2 lab practical examinations @ 50 points

100

5 - 10 report sheets @ 5 or 10 points each

50

quizzes and assignments

40

 attendance 10

Grading:

Your final grade will be determined as follows:

Grade

point range

percentage range

A

180-200

90 - 100%

B

160-179

80 - 89%

C

140-159

70 - 79%

D

120-139

60 - 69%

F

Below 120

below 60%

____________________________________________________________

Course Schedule:

Tentative Lab Schedule-- Changes or additions to this syllabus, including reading, exam schedule, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.

Date

Laboratory

Lab

May 22

No Lab

May 24

Introduction to BIOL1111 laboratory

Laboratory Safety-   Complete safety forms in class. 

No Show Reporting

Review Safety Policies

MONDAY, May 28th, MEMORIAL DAY, NO CLASSES ON CAMPUS

May 29

Process of Science

 Lab 1

May 31

Biological Molecules

Lab 2

June 5

Microscopes

Lab 3

June 7

Diffusion and Osmosis Lab

Lab 4

June 12

Enzyme Function

Lab 5

June 14

Review for Lab Practical I

Labs 1 - 5

June 19

LAB PRACTICAL I

June 21

Photosynthesis  

Lab 6

FRIDAY, June 22, 2012, Last day to withdraw and receive a W grade

June 26

Cellular Respiration/Fermentation

Lab 7

June 28

DNA Extraction Exercise

Cellular Reproduction Overview: Mitosis

Lab 8

July 3

NO LAB - Mitosis Exercise Online

Lab 9

WEDNESDAY, July 4, 2012,  INDEPENDENCE HOLIDAY, NO CLASSES

July 5

NO LAB - Genetics Exercise Online

Lab 10

July 10

Genetics Review
Review for Lab Practical II

July 12

LAB PRACTICAL II

Last day of Lab

Labs 6-10

Mid-term Progress Report

Due to the relatively small number of laboratory reports that will have been returned by mid-term, no mid-term grade will be reported for this course. Students making unsatisfactory progress will be contacted individually by the instructor before mid-term.

PLEASE NOTE:  BIOL1111 Lab course ends after Practical II. 

CLASSROOM REGULATIONS AND POLICIES:

 

Students must abide by policies in the Clayton State University Student Handbook, and the Basic Undergraduate Student Responsibilities.

  1. Attendance is required.  Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each lab period and will count as part of your course grade.  For every lab section you attend, you will earn 1 point, for a total of 10.  Students who come after roll is called will be considered tardy and will earn 0 points for that day.  If you are absent from a lab, you are still responsible for the missed material for exams, quizzes, notebook, lab report, etc.  You cannot get any points for any work pertaining to the lab that was missed (quizzes, assignments, etc).  Students who do not attend regularly generally do not do well in the course.
  2. Students with a valid excuse may attend another lab section with permission of both instructors.  This is only available to those students who have a valid, written excuse.  The only absences that are excusable are for illness (requiring a doctors note), accident (requiring note from the police), and legal reasons (requiring a note from the judge), and work obligations outside of the ordinary (requiring a note from your boss).  The following are examples of absences that are NOT excusable:  travel (including leaving for break early or coming back late) or any type of appointment (doctor, dental, eye, etc.  You know when your class meets, don't make an appointment during that time). 
  3. Exams start at the beginning of class.  The instructor may permit a student to begin late if the excuse is reasonable.  Students who are more than 10 minutes late will not be allowed to begin the exam. There are no make-up exams.  With a valid excuse (see #2 above) you may attend another section with the permission of both instructors.  All students are required to take exam 2.
  4. Quizzes will be given at the beginning of class.  Students who are late must remain outside of the classroom until the quiz is finished and will receive a grade of zero.  There are no make-up quizzes.  A quiz may be based on your attendance on a particular day.  Quizzes, including attendance quizzes, may be unannounced.
  5. Assignments are due at the beginning of class.  No exceptions.  Assignments may be turned in up to 24 hours late for half credit.
  6. No talking while the instructor or another student is talking.  Students repeatedly violating this policy will be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.
  7. Computers are for note-taking, research, or other class related activities only.  Students using them for surfing the internet, checking email, playing games, etc will be asked to turn them off.  On subsequent offenses, the student may be asked to leave the classroom for being disruptive.
  8. Visitors are not permitted without the instructor’s permission.  Children are not allowed in the classroom at anytime.
  9. No form of academic dishonesty will be tolerated in this course.  The most common forms are cheating and plagiarism, but any type of activity that is considered dishonest by reasonable standards will constitute academic dishonesty.  The minimum penalty is a grade of zero on the work involved.  The maximum penalty is expulsion from the university.  Be aware that students found in violation of the university’s academic dishonesty code have lost scholarships, athletic eligibility, and/or their U.S. student visa (if an international student).  All forms of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs for investigation.  Judicial procedures are described at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/judicial/.
  10. No form of disruptive behavior will be tolerated in this class.  While a variety of behaviors can be disruptive in a classroom setting, more serious examples include belligerent, abusive, profane, and/or threatening behavior.  A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or is found to be repeatedly disruptive while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class.  A student who is dismissed is entitled to due process and will be afforded such rights as soon as possible following dismissal.  If found in violation, a student may be administratively withdrawn and may receive a grade of WF.  For more information, please refer to: http://as.clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm

 

Common examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

    • Monopolizing classroom discussions
    • Failing to respect the rights of other students to express their viewpoints
    • Talking when the instructors or other students are speaking
    • Constant questions or interruptions which interfere with the instructor’s presentation
    • Overt inattentiveness (e.g. sleeping or surfing the internet)
    • Creating excessive noise
    • Entering the class late or leaving the class early
    • Use of cell phones or pagers in class
    • Inordinate or inappropriate demands for time or attention
    • Poor personal hygiene (e.g. noticeably offensive body odor)
    • Refusal to comply with faculty direction

Students exhibiting these types of behaviors can expect a warning from the instructor or dismissal for the lesson in which the behavior occurs. Failure to correct such behaviors can result in dismissal from the course.

More extreme examples of disruptive behavior include, but are not limited to:

·        Use of profanity or pejorative language

·        Intoxication

·        Verbal abuse of instructor or other students (e.g. taunting, badgering, intimidation)

·        Harassment of instructor or other students

·        Threats to harm oneself or others

·        Physical violence

Students exhibiting these more extreme examples of disruptive behavior may be dismissed from the lesson or the entire course.

Students dismissed from a lesson will leave the classroom immediately or may be subject to additional penalties. Dismissed students are responsible for any course material or assignments missed.

Students dismissed from a course have the right to appeal the dismissal to the department head responsible for the course. Appeals beyond the department head may also be pursued. If no appeal is made or the appeal is unsuccessful, the student will receive a grade o WF (withdrawal – failing) regardless of the current grade in the course.

Conditions attributed to physical or psychological disabilities are not considered as a legitimate excuse for disruptive behavior.

The description of disruptive behavior and listings of examples of disruptive behavior are taken from the Web sites of James Madison University, the University of Delaware and Virginia Tech.

 

Changes or additions to this syllabus, including reading, exam schedule, grading, and course policies can be made at the discretion of the instructor at any time.