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First-Year Writing @ Clayton State University

Course Descriptions

General Education Outcome for Area A: Students will write effective expository and argumentative essays that consider purpose and audience.

Course Descriptions and Learning Outcomes

English 1101

Catalog Description:

ENGL 1101 English Composition I (3-0-3) is a composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills. Grades of D in ENGL 1101 will not count toward graduation in any degree program. This course is part of the core curriculum (Area A) and will enhance students’ ability to think critically and communicate effectively.

Clayton State’s Emphasis:

At Clayton State, English 1101 is designed to increase students’ ability to construct academic written essays and to make connections in writing to their own experiences, to Clayton State, to other students, to their communities, and to their future profession. The course offers instruction in writing processes, collaborative writing strategies, methods of organization, research skills, discourse conventions of Standard Written English, rhetorical strategies, computer-based writing, and the production of expository academic essays in MLA format. Readings consider issues of contemporary and cultural concern. Students reflect on their writing, engage in peer review, and create an eportfolio that will be completed in English 1102.

Outcome 1: Writing Process

Students will understand and engage in writing as a process.

Related Objectives

  • engage in recursive pre-writing, drafting, and revising activities
  • evaluate and reflect on their writing processes

Outcome 2: Collaboration

Students will engage in the collaborative, social aspects of writing.

Related Objectives:

  • compose with peers
  • respond constructively to peers’ papers in written and oral modes
  • seek and use feedback from peers, instructors, and Writing Consultants 

Outcome 3: Purpose/Audience Awareness Students will write clearly for a specified audience and purpose. Related Objectives

  • rhetorically analyze a variety of texts
  • analyze and articulate one’s own position in relation to others’
  • write papers with a clearly developed thesis and support designed to address the exigencies of various contexts and audiences
  • read critically, rhetorically, and for various purposes
  • summarize responsibly and incorporate others’ positions responsibly into one’s own work

Outcome 4: Rhetorical Strategies

Students will read and write a variety of nonfiction expository and argumentative genres.

  • Related Objectives compare and contrast various genres, including essays (academic and popular), literature reviews, annotated bibliographies, proposals, blogs, websites, and reports
  • identify and use various methods of developing paragraphs
  • identify and use various organizational strategies
  • distinguish types of evidence used in essays (i.e. anecdotes, logical reasoning, studies, reports, statistics, interviews, academic or popular essays, etc.)
  • recognize fact, opinion, inference, and bias in texts 

Outcome 5: Discourse Conventions and Effective Style Students will produce coherent, organized, effective, readable academic writing for a variety of rhetorical situations, both print and digital.

Related Objectives

  • demonstrate understanding of the conventions of common public, academic, and professional writing
  • select evidence appropriate to the context to develop a claim and support
  • organize papers effectively
  • practice grammatical revision to produce readable, effective Standard Written English (SWE)

Outcome 6: Citation Formats Students will learn basic citation formatting in academic writing.

Related Objectives

  • understand that different disciplines use different style manuals
  • understand the difference between in-text quotations, block quotations, and proper formatting for each
  • use MLA to format papers and cite information
  • summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources accurately to support claims

Outcome 7: Writing Aids and Technologies Students will effectively use writing aids, such as handbooks, dictionaries, online aids and resources, and tutors to research ideas and improve their writing.

Related Objectives

  • use both print and online writing handbook
  • use an authoritative online or print dictionary
  • name and use one writing handbook and OWL
  • use CSU standard software load (MS Office Professional) to effectively draft, revise, and edit papers
  • use CSU standard software load (MS Office Professional) to store and compose their work locally and in the cloud
  • use online databases to search for scholarly and popular articles
  • use the Clayton State library resources to locate sources for papers
  • demonstrate understanding of the affordances and constraints of composition technologies 

English 1102

Catalog Description:

 ENGL 1102 English Composition II (3-0-3) is a composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiently required by English 1101, emphasizing interpretation and evaluation, and incorporating a variety of more advanced research skills.  Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in English 1101. 

Clayton State’s Emphasis:

At Clayton State, English 1102: English Composition II, emphasizes argumentative writing with sources so that students make connections in writing to their own experiences, to Clayton State, to other students, to their communities, and to their future profession. Instruction covers a variety of argument types and styles, research methods, and techniques for writing with sources. To this end, English 1102 also focuses on critical reading, interpretation, and evaluation of texts drawn from a wide variety of sources. Building on their English 1101 eportfolio, students reflect on their writing, select their best work, and complete their eportfolio in 1102.

Outcome 1: Genre and Rhetorical Knowledge Students read a variety of genres critically to identify and evaluate texts’ rhetorical situation and features.

            Related Objectives

  • interpret a variety of genres from academic and professional contexts, in a variety of modes and media (such as an editorial, blog, book or film review, report, literature review, proposal, position paper, etc.)
  • select and use genres according to the interplay of context, audience, and purpose within a given rhetorical situation
  • interpret and evaluate a variety of genres

Outcome 2:  Evaluating Arguments and Rhetorical Situations

Students will understand and analyze various elements of argumentation.

Related Objectives

  • evaluate the effectiveness of arguments in print, digital, and oral formats
  • interpret and compose in a variety of modes: linguistic, aural, visual, spatial, gestural, and procedural.
  • analyze appeals to logos, pathos, and ethos
  • analyze sources to understand the causes and effects of their rhetorical choices
  • cultivate an attitude of openness toward other perspectives, including responses to one’s own productions
  • revise purposes and approaches in relation to developing cultural knowledge

Outcome 3:  Writing Arguments Students will apply principles of argumentation in writing and develop effective arguments.

Related Objectives

  • create an arguable thesis statement and support it with appropriate evidence
  • summarize, analyze, and address a set of positions on issue/debate/topic
  • evaluate the contribution of an argument to a debate using rhetorical analysis
  • compose arguments that address the exigencies of various contexts, exhibiting appropriate and effective rhetorical strategies
  • learn from other perspectives, and incorporate these responsibly and respectfully into one’s own work  

Outcome 3: Writing with Sources Students effectively synthesize a variety of sources to create effective arguments.

            Related Objectives

  • use works of various genres to promote ideas for argument
  • interpret and evaluate various sources
  • synthesize multiple sources
  • write effective, organized, readable essays drawing on multiple sources, both print and digita
  • develop their own argument about an issue rather than relying on a source’s argument and/or organizational structure
  • summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources ethically and effectively to support claims
  • introduce borrowed material into papers using rhetorically effective verbs and signal phrases

Outcome 4: Citation and Format of Researched Writing Students effectively cite sources using the appropriate format.

Related Objectives

  •         compare and contrast at least two style formats (MLA, APA, etc.)
  •         identify and correctly use MLA for citing borrowed material
  •         use the correct format for both short, in-text quotations and longer block quotations
  •         format essays correctly using MLA format

Outcome 5: Research Technologies

Students will use research technologies to locate source material.

Related Objectives

 

  •  identify, select, and use appropriate electronic databases to find sources
  • locate primary and secondary sources, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources
  •  locate source material in the Clayton State library, the library’s databases, and various online search engines, evaluating the material for credibility and reliability
  •  distinguish between scholarly/academic sources, trade/professional sources, and general/popular sources

Outcome 6: Discourse Conventions and Effective Style Students will produce coherent, organized, effective, readable academic writing for a variety of rhetorical situations, both print and digital.

            Related Objectives

  • understand the conventions of common academic writing (such as reading responses, blogs, academic arguments, rhetorical analyses, synthesis essays, and reviews)
  • make effective stylistic choices that enhance readability
  • select evidence appropriate to the context to develop a claim and support
  • organize papers effectively
  • practice grammatical revision to produce readable, effective Standard Written English (SWE)