Syllabus

 
 
 

 

ENGL 1101                     

SPRING 2014

Instructor:  Ronald Ramsey           

Office: A&S 116

Email: ronaldramsey@clayton.edu       

Office Hours: By Appointment

Phone: 466-4735

 

 

Required Text:

 

Howard, Rebecca Moore. Writing Matters: A Handbook for Writing and Research. With 

Connect Plus 2.0. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011. ISBN 978-0077-6710-20.

 

Lamb, Mary R., ed. Connections: Guide to First-Year Writing @ Clayton State 

University.Fountainhead Press, 2013. ISBN 978-1-59871-564-4.

 

Course Description

 

English 1101- A course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and including introductory use of a variety of research skills.

 

In this section, extensive practice is required in strategies for drafting, revising, reflecting and responding to the writing of your peers. Your best writing of the semester will be collected into a portfolio for a final assessment of your work in the course. 

 

Course Objectives

 

To pass this course, students will:

  • Effectively communicate ideas related to assigned materials in written form
  • Write well defined and adequately developed expository essays
  • Demonstrate a comprehension of assigned readings
  • Demonstrate the use of proper grammar, diction, and mechanics

 

Requirements

 

  • All work must be turned in on the assigned due dates. 
  • Attendance is mandatory.  Failure to attend each session of English 1101 may result in students missing in-class assignments. 
  • Individual and group participation are both required in this course. 
  • Students will be expected to submit a rough draft of all major essays. 
  • Final drafts of each essay must be typed and double-spaced.
  • All major essays must be submitted in order to pass English 1101!!

 

Attendance and Participation:

 

Writing is a skill that requires practice through revisions, tutoring, and collaboration.  Talking about ideas with others—including class discussions—improves your writing as it helps hone, clarify, and create knowledge.  Since we are working together to improve our own and others’ writing, you should expect to participate; this is not a lecture class.  For these reasons, your attendance and thoughtful participation are crucial for your success. Thus, students who miss more than 20% of classes may fail the course (more than 9 classes).  Because of the cumulative nature of the course material, if you miss 5 classes before the midpoint, I’ll withdraw you and assign a “W.”  You should be present and thoughtfully participating most of the class to receive credit for the class day.  Present or not, students are responsible for everything that goes on in class.  Call a classmate to find out what you missed and come prepared

 

Absences for religious holidays, athletic participation, or other university-sanctioned events will be excused if students notify the instructor in advance.   Other absences (for illness, accident, or personal tragedy) may be instructor-approved; however, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor—via email or a phone message—to explain the absence within 12 hours of the missed class, or to provide documentation at the following class meeting. 

 

Absences that are not university-sanctioned or instructor-approved will mean a loss of participation points.  Generally students who miss more than three weeks of classes will fail the course: that means more than 6 absences for TR sections.

 

Disruption of the Learning Environment:

 

Behavior that disrupts the teaching—learning process during class activities will not be tolerated, and a disruptive student may be dismissed from the course and may receive a grade of WF.  Please see <http://a-s.

Clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm> for a full explanation.

 

Grading

 

Essays will be graded based on the following guidelines:

  • Clarity and definition of topic
  • Format (thesis, body, conclusion)
  • Development of ideas:  Be sure to explain all ideas thoroughly and assume that the reader knows very little regarding the subject.
  • Providing adequate support for the thesis paragraph (information must be provided to support all claims in this paragraph)
  • Grammar and mechanics: Make several revisions of writing assignments, if necessary, or have someone else assume the role of editor
  • Fluency and transition
  • Letter grades: To earn a grade of “average” (a “C”), your essay must fulfill all the requirements of the assignment, present an organized, fairly well-developed purpose that reflects awareness of the terms of our discussion.  If I have difficulty discerning the presence of an argument/purpose, or if careless style or lack of organization significantly impede my ability to discern your argument/purpose (even if the argument/purpose itself is good), your grade will be lower than a “C.”  A well-presented, well-reasoned, and insightful paper, with few grammatical or stylistic errors, will earn a “B” while a paper of exceptional excellence in its reasoning, handling of evidence, and presentation will earn an “A.”  An “A” paper examines the issue at hand in all its complexity and effectively fulfills its purpose through careful organization as well as stylistic appeal. 
  • Revision: Revision is an integral part of the writing process and an essential part of improving one’s writing.  To that end, multiple drafts of papers that show substantial revision are required.  However, once a paper has been graded, it may not be revised for an improved grade. Although class participation and collaboration improve your writing and are habits I hope you will develop, they are graded as classwork and not part of your final paper grade.  As such, your paper grade reflects your final written product rather than your effort.

 

Grading Scale

 

A                              90-100

B                              80-89

C                              70-79

D                              60-69

F                               below 60

 

Deadlines and Due Dates:

All work produced out of class is due at the beginning of the class meeting on the date specified.  Unless special arrangements have been made with the instructor, penalties will be applied to late papers.

 

Midterm Grade Statement:

Midterm grades will be posted before the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty.  They will be calculated by the average of each student’s graded work at that time.

 

Final Exam:

Writing classes will meet at the scheduled exam time.

 

Incomplete Grades

 

A grade of I (incomplete) will be issued only in case of an extreme hardship.  This will be determined by the instructor along with the Language and Literature department.

 

Other Requirements

 

Students in this course are required to take part in the University’s Measure of Academic Proficiency and Progress Test (MAPP), an important component of the SACS reaffirmation document in the testing center.  Information of the test is available at:

http://adminservices.clayton.edu/testingcenter/MAPP.htm.  Call 678-466-4495 or go by the Testing Center to reserve a session (ground floor of the library).

 

Students are also required to take the Regents’ Test, a requirement for all students earning degrees in any of the University System of Georgia schools.  Information is located at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/testingcenter/Regents.htm. 

 

Academic Honesty:

 

You should be aware of important general information contained in the printed Class Schedule, in the 2009-2010 Clayton State University online catalog, and in the “Student Code of Conduct” section of the online Student Handbook, especially policies governing plagiarism and other academic misconduct.  If you need help understanding when to cite something or how to make clear your references, please ask. 

Plagiarism involves copying another person’s words or ideas without citing the source with appropriate documentation.  Any student who plagiarizes fails the plagiarized assignment.  A plagiarized paper is considered an incomplete assignment.  Any student who plagiarizes will fail the course.

 

NOTE:  Students with disabilities requesting accommodations should contact the Disability Services Coordinator, Administration Building A23 via phone at 678-466-5445 or via e-mail at disabilityservices@clayton.edu.

 

University Attendance Policy:

 

Students are expected to attend and participate in every class meeting.  Instructors establish specific policies relating to absences in their courses and communicate these policies to the students through the course syllabi.  Individual instructors, based upon the nature of the course, determine what effect excused and unexcused absences have in determining grades and upon students’ ability to remain enrolled in their courses.  The university reserves the right to determine that excessive absences whether justified or not, are sufficient cause for institutional withdrawals or failing grades.

 

Computer Policy: All students at Clayton State are required to have access to a laptop computer and to use that computer actively in all courses for e-mail access, electronic submission of papers, and other uses.

 

Questions or Concerns:  If you have questions or concerns about your class, you must attempt to resolve those with your instructor as soon as possible. If your concerns remain after you have conferred with your instructor, you may see Dr.Barbara Goodman, the Head of the Department of Language & Literature, in office G-210-B in the Arts and Sciences Building.

Other Sources of Help:

The Library staff can help you locate information to use in your writing. Library resources are also available online at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/library/.

The Writers’ Studio 224 is located in the A&S building, room 224.  There you can talk with trained writing tutors about your writing projects.  They are available to work with you at any stage of your paper, from generating ideas to understanding how to format correctly.

The Center for Academic Success (CAS), located on the lower floor of the Library, is available for help either on a drop-in basis or by referral from your instructor. Information about the CAS is available on the Internet at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/caa.

The Department of Language & Literature homepage (http://a-s.clayton.edu/langlit) contains links to information on the Regents’ Test and other useful materials such as the “mini-handbook” guide to the Clayton State University Writing Guidelines.

The Office of Student and Enrollment Services can direct you to sources of academic, career, and personal counseling, as well as to information about financial aid and student organizations and activities. The Internet address for this office is http://adminservices.clayton.edu/provost/enrollmentservices.htm

 

 

 

 

ENGL 1101                                                                           Fall 2013

Instructor:  Ronald Ramsey                                               Office: A&S 116

Email: ronaldramsey@clayton.edu                                  Office Hours: By Appointment

Phone: 466-4712

 

 

Required Text:

 

Howard, Rebecca Moore. Writing Matters: A Handbook for Writing and Research. With 

Connect Plus 2.0. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011. ISBN 978-0077-6710-20.

 

Lamb, Mary R., ed. Connections: Guide to First-Year Writing @ Clayton State 

University.Fountainhead Press, 2013. ISBN 978-1-59871-564-4.

 

Course Description

 

English 1101- A course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and including introductory use of a variety of research skills.

 

In this section, extensive practice is required in strategies for drafting, revising, reflecting and responding to the writing of your peers. Your best writing of the semester will be collected into a portfolio for a final assessment of your work in the course. 

 

Course Objectives

 

To pass this course, students will:

  • Effectively communicate ideas related to assigned materials in written form
  • Write well defined and adequately developed expository essays
  • Demonstrate a comprehension of assigned readings
  • Demonstrate the use of proper grammar, diction, and mechanics

 

Requirements

 

  • All work must be turned in on the assigned due dates. 
  • Attendance is mandatory.  Failure to attend each session of English 1101 may result in students missing in-class assignments. 
  • Individual and group participation are both required in this course. 
  • Students will be expected to submit a rough draft of all major essays. 
  • Final drafts of each essay must be typed and double-spaced.
  • All major essays must be submitted in order to pass English 1101!!

 

Attendance and Participation:

 

Writing is a skill that requires practice through revisions, tutoring, and collaboration.  Talking about ideas with others—including class discussions—improves your writing as it helps hone, clarify, and create knowledge.  Since we are working together to improve our own and others’ writing, you should expect to participate; this is not a lecture class.  For these reasons, your attendance and thoughtful participation are crucial for your success. Thus, students who miss more than 20% of classes may fail the course (more than 9 classes).  Because of the cumulative nature of the course material, if you miss 5 classes before the midpoint, I’ll withdraw you and assign a “W.”  You should be present and thoughtfully participating most of the class to receive credit for the class day.  Present or not, students are responsible for everything that goes on in class.  Call a classmate to find out what you missed and come prepared

 

Absences for religious holidays, athletic participation, or other university-sanctioned events will be excused if students notify the instructor in advance.   Other absences (for illness, accident, or personal tragedy) may be instructor-approved; however, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor—via email or a phone message—to explain the absence within 12 hours of the missed class, or to provide documentation at the following class meeting. 

 

Absences that are not university-sanctioned or instructor-approved will mean a loss of participation points.  Generally students who miss more than three weeks of classes will fail the course: that means more than 6 absences for TR sections.

 

Disruption of the Learning Environment:

 

Behavior that disrupts the teaching—learning process during class activities will not be tolerated, and a disruptive student may be dismissed from the course and may receive a grade of WF.  Please see <http://a-s.

Clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm> for a full explanation.

 

Grading

 

Essays will be graded based on the following guidelines:

  • Clarity and definition of topic
  • Format (thesis, body, conclusion)
  • Development of ideas:  Be sure to explain all ideas thoroughly and assume that the reader knows very little regarding the subject.
  • Providing adequate support for the thesis paragraph (information must be provided to support all claims in this paragraph)
  • Grammar and mechanics: Make several revisions of writing assignments, if necessary, or have someone else assume the role of editor
  • Fluency and transition
  • Letter grades: To earn a grade of “average” (a “C”), your essay must fulfill all the requirements of the assignment, present an organized, fairly well-developed purpose that reflects awareness of the terms of our discussion.  If I have difficulty discerning the presence of an argument/purpose, or if careless style or lack of organization significantly impede my ability to discern your argument/purpose (even if the argument/purpose itself is good), your grade will be lower than a “C.”  A well-presented, well-reasoned, and insightful paper, with few grammatical or stylistic errors, will earn a “B” while a paper of exceptional excellence in its reasoning, handling of evidence, and presentation will earn an “A.”  An “A” paper examines the issue at hand in all its complexity and effectively fulfills its purpose through careful organization as well as stylistic appeal. 
  • Revision: Revision is an integral part of the writing process and an essential part of improving one’s writing.  To that end, multiple drafts of papers that show substantial revision are required.  However, once a paper has been graded, it may not be revised for an improved grade. Although class participation and collaboration improve your writing and are habits I hope you will develop, they are graded as classwork and not part of your final paper grade.  As such, your paper grade reflects your final written product rather than your effort.

 

Grading Scale

 

A                              90-100

B                              80-89

C                              70-79

D                              60-69

F                               below 60

 

Deadlines and Due Dates:

All work produced out of class is due at the beginning of the class meeting on the date specified.  Unless special arrangements have been made with the instructor, penalties will be applied to late papers.

 

Midterm Grade Statement:

Midterm grades will be posted before the deadline for withdrawal without academic penalty.  They will be calculated by the average of each student’s graded work at that time.

 

Final Exam:

Writing classes will meet at the scheduled exam time.

 

Incomplete Grades

 

A grade of I (incomplete) will be issued only in case of an extreme hardship.  This will be determined by the instructor along with the Language and Literature department.

 

Other Requirements

 

Students in this course are required to take part in the University’s Measure of Academic Proficiency and Progress Test (MAPP), an important component of the SACS reaffirmation document in the testing center.  Information of the test is available at:

http://adminservices.clayton.edu/testingcenter/MAPP.htm.  Call 678-466-4495 or go by the Testing Center to reserve a session (ground floor of the library).

 

Students are also required to take the Regents’ Test, a requirement for all students earning degrees in any of the University System of Georgia schools.  Information is located at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/testingcenter/Regents.htm. 

 

Academic Honesty:

 

You should be aware of important general information contained in the printed Class Schedule, in the 2009-2010 Clayton State University online catalog, and in the “Student Code of Conduct” section of the online Student Handbook, especially policies governing plagiarism and other academic misconduct.  If you need help understanding when to cite something or how to make clear your references, please ask. 

Plagiarism involves copying another person’s words or ideas without citing the source with appropriate documentation.  Any student who plagiarizes fails the plagiarized assignment.  A plagiarized paper is considered an incomplete assignment.  Any student who plagiarizes will fail the course.

 

NOTE:  Students with disabilities requesting accommodations should contact the Disability Services Coordinator, Administration Building A23 via phone at 678-466-5445 or via e-mail at disabilityservices@clayton.edu.

 

University Attendance Policy:

 

Students are expected to attend and participate in every class meeting.  Instructors establish specific policies relating to absences in their courses and communicate these policies to the students through the course syllabi.  Individual instructors, based upon the nature of the course, determine what effect excused and unexcused absences have in determining grades and upon students’ ability to remain enrolled in their courses.  The university reserves the right to determine that excessive absences whether justified or not, are sufficient cause for institutional withdrawals or failing grades.

 

Computer Policy: All students at Clayton State are required to have access to a laptop computer and to use that computer actively in all courses for e-mail access, electronic submission of papers, and other uses.

 

Questions or Concerns:  If you have questions or concerns about your class, you must attempt to resolve those with your instructor as soon as possible. If your concerns remain after you have conferred with your instructor, you may see Dr.Barbara Goodman, the Head of the Department of Language & Literature, in office G-210-B in the Arts and Sciences Building.

Other Sources of Help:

The Library staff can help you locate information to use in your writing. Library resources are also available online at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/library/.

The Writers’ Studio 224 is located in the A&S building, room 224.  There you can talk with trained writing tutors about your writing projects.  They are available to work with you at any stage of your paper, from generating ideas to understanding how to format correctly.

The Center for Academic Success (CAS), located on the lower floor of the Library, is available for help either on a drop-in basis or by referral from your instructor. Information about the CAS is available on the Internet at http://adminservices.clayton.edu/caa.

The Department of Language & Literature homepage (http://a-s.clayton.edu/langlit) contains links to information on the Regents’ Test and other useful materials such as the “mini-handbook” guide to the Clayton State University Writing Guidelines.

The Office of Student and Enrollment Services can direct you to sources of academic, career, and personal counseling, as well as to information about financial aid and student organizations and activities. The Internet address for this office is http://adminservices.clayton.edu/provost/enrollmentservices.htm

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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